How it works — measuring Emotional Intelligence

We facilitate assessment of Emotional Intelligence to identify strengths and weaknesses, track development over the course of each program and provide ongoing support.
Please see below for information about the measures we use.

Why is measuring EI so important anyway?

Aristotle-EI recognises that no two school communities are the same. The Aristotle-EI team will partner with you to ensure each program is tailored to the needs and goals of your unique school community.

When including Aristotle EI development programs in a school curriculum, it is important to be aware of the key objectives for doing so. Being mindful of your goals provides vital opportunity to measure the success of your approach. Measuring EI outcomes in your school enables you to monitor how each program is functioning from year to year, allowing you to adapt your approach to meet the changing climate of your school community. This will help to ensure you are best positioned to reach your desired outcomes.

How can you use EI assessments in your school?

Collecting EI data can help you understand your students in greater detail. Aristotle EI can train you to use EI data to identify:

– Individual strengths your students possess

– Students who may need additional support

– Possible  hurdles to academic success in under-performing students

– Monitor aspects of social and emotional development

 

Our assessment tools for primary & secondary schools

AGE GROUP: 5-11 Years

Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test
– Early Years (SUEIT-EY)

Number of Questions:
Part 1 (36 items) Part 2 (19 items)

Administration method:
Self-report

Group testing:
Yes

Time required:
2 x 20-30 minute sessions

Format:
Both online and paper versions of this assessment are available

Alternate Versions:
N/A

Assessment outcomes:
Sub-scale scores for each EI domain.

AGE GROUP: 12 -19 Years

Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test
(SUIET)

Number of Questions: 57

Administration method:
Part 1 (Self-report) Part 2 (Ability based)

Administration method:
Self-report

Group testing:
Yes

Time required:
20-30 minutes (depending on reading level)

Formats:
Both online and paper versions of this assessment are available

Alternate Versions:
Peer-rated and Teacher rated versions are also available

Assessment outcomes:
Percentile scores for each EI domain

Participate in research

We are interested in collaborating with other researchers and teachers to learn more about emotional intelligence in schools. Please contact Maryanne Kapoulitsas if you would like to collaborate with us on research in this area or if your school is interested in participating.

Some of our current research studies include:

evaluation of existing emotional intelligence development programs

the role of the internet, social media and tablet use in differences in emotional intelligence

the relationship between pro-environment behaviours and emotional intelligence

the relationship between scholastic performance, emotional intelligence and cognition

 

 

Student projects

The effects of emotional intelligence on bullying and victimisation in schools, Grades 4 to 6.
This study aims to understand how emotional intelligence relates to bullying, peer victimsation, resilience, aggression, and academic achievement in young students.

Further information and the study questionnaire can be accessed via the link below:

https://swinburnefhad.au1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0OgUExoBboYNgjz

Please contact Emily Bunnett (PhD candidate) for further information erbunnett@swin.edu.au

We have worked with many schools in the primary and secondary school sectors around the world, all with unique students, long term objectives and capacities in which to get there. We would be happy to share our experience with you to help find the most suitable way for your school to move forward in utilising EI assessments and/or programs.

Get in touch here